Resources for SEND

Hand Washing Tips for People With Sensory Difficulties

Sensory Integration Education – Hand Washing Tips for People With Sensory Difficulties

How physical activity can support children with special educational needs and disabilities at home

Typically, children with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) would participate in physical activity outdoors and in school. Recently, school closures and restricted access to outdoor spaces such as parks has meant that parents and guardians will have to take a more active role in encouraging and supporting their children to be more active at home, especially if they are ‘shielding’.

Benefits of being physically active include improved cardiovascular fitness, reduced risk of becoming overweight or obese, and increased bone and muscle strength. A relationship also exists between physical activity and improved mental well-being, problem solving skills and concentration. Here are five top tips for helping your children to be more physically active at home.

How physical activity can support children with special educational needs and disabilities at home – BBC Bitesize

 

Have a look at the link below – a series created to explore the importance of language when talking about Down Syndrome

Language Creates Reality

 

Have a look at BBC Bitesize……………..

SEND (special educational needs and disabilities) resources, activities and support to help you and your family during lockdown.

Parents’ Toolkit: SEND – BBC Bitesize

by Dr Anne Emerson, Associate Professor in Special and Inclusive Education at the University of Nottingham.

Autism is a very broad spectrum, and those who are autistic have a wide range of varied characteristics, just like all children. However, there are a number of aspects that many autistic people will have in common. One of these is a need to be clear about what is going to happen and to know what is expected of them. This can be seen as an ‘intolerance of uncertainty’ where unfamiliar places or events can cause anxiety.

This goes along with some challenges of socialising with other people because some aspects of communication, either the verbal or non-verbal aspects, or both, are difficult to understand or to do.

Most children who are identified as being on the autism spectrum, or who have autistic traits, attend mainstream schools. All schools have rules, which can often help autistic children to know what to do. However, unexpected things frequently happen, and when they do, autistic children tend to feel uncomfortable or frightened.

These tips will help you to support your child to feel safe and confident at home and at school. First, I will offer advice for children in mainstream schools and then tips for children in special schools.

Click on the link below 🙂

Schooling tips for parents of autistic children – BBC Bitesize

 

Resources – Learning disability, ADHD and autism